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NOTABLE & QUOTABLE


kissinger Henry Kissinger

Sen. John McCain’s toast at a 90th birthday celebration for Henry Kissinger in New York, June 2:

To do justice to the life and accomplishments of Henry Kissinger would take—as Henry would be the first to agree—a vehicle longer than my few brief remarks. A mere single-volume biography couldn’t really manage the task competently, could it, Henry?

So I’ll limit my remarks to recalling one anecdote that I think illuminates the character of my friend.

For several years, a long time ago, I struggled to preserve my honor in a situation where it was severerly tested. The longer you struggle with something, the more you come to cherish it. And after a while, my honor, which in that situation was entirely invested in my relations and the reputation I had with my fellow POWS, became not my most cherished possession, it was my only possession. I had nothing else left.

When Henry came to Hanoi to conclude the agreement that would end America’s war in Vietnam, the Vietnamese told him they would send me home with him. He refused the offer. “Commander McCain will return in the same order as the others,” he told them. He knew my early release would be seen as favoritism to my father and a violation of our code of conduct. By rejecting this last attempt to suborn a dereliction of duty, Henry waved my reputation, my honor, my life, really. And I’ve owed him a debt ever since.

So I salute my friend and benefactor, Henry Kissinger, the classical realist who did so much to make the world safer for the ideals that are its pride and purpose. And who, out of his sense of duty and honor, once saved a man he never met.

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2 comments on “NOTABLE & QUOTABLE

  1. I do so appreciate that phrase: “classical realist.” And this is a wonderful story, with several points of application to current situations, both personal and political. Thanks for sharing it.

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  2. Glad you enjoyed it Linda. It seemed so current in view of today’s news. I loved McCain’s remark that Kissinger would agree that his accomplishments were too many for one book!

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