7 Comments

Five Fascinating Facts about Thomas Paine


Five Fascinating Facts about Thomas Paine.

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7 comments on “Five Fascinating Facts about Thomas Paine

  1. Interesting, I am ashamed to say I knew nothing about Mr Paine before I read this. Yet again an education! Thanks

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  2. It must have been an interesting time. My forebears came over in 1630, and I have often wondered if they were Tories or Whigs. After all, the rebels were breaking the law of the land at that time. Fun to read about though.

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  3. Some might argue, Kayti, that Charles I, a Scottish Stuart, was breaking the law by claiming to be above it, contrary to the English Magna Carta, thus making him the rebel, which he bravely paid for with his life in 1649.

    You have the genes of a Parliamentarian, maybe, since your forebears emigrated in 1630, five years after Charles I came to the throne.

    In Great Britain, we call the Revolutionary War the American War of Independence, since it did not seek to overthrow the constitutional monarchy at home.

    You would have flourished as either a whig or a tory after the Restoration in 1660 and the Glorious Revolution of 1688.

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    • An English friend told me that we did not fight fair, since we caught them by surprise by hiding behind trees and jumping out while the brave English boys, dressed in their bright red coats and noisily pounded their drums were unaware of our presence.
      My father’s line suggests a relationship to William 111 around 1688 though I know little of it. I need to study history a bit more.

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      • As you undoubtedly know, that is a favourite caricature of the war and an injustice to both sides.

        The most interesting things, to me, about the war are the question of divided loyalties and freedom for slaves. I, too need to read more history.

        How interesting about William III, our first constitutional monarch, who invaded by invitation!

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  4. I would have invited Thomas Paine to my Independence Day picnic! I actually was thinking about inviting Alexis de Tocqueville. He could bring his book, and I’d let him read excerpts from it. Then, I decided I wasn’t quite up to poking a stick in the wasp’s nest, and let it be.

    The friend I spent the weekend with is dealing with macular degeneration now, too. She has wet in one eye and dry in the other. What a deal. She says so far, so good. She’s taking a goodly number of vitamins along with other treatment, and says it’s been stable for nearly a year now.

    I hope your 4th was lovely.Ours was quiet, with some fireworks on the beach, but no big shows, and no traffic!

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  5. Gosh, that would have been quite a picnic listening to old Alexis read from his tome. At least Paine put all his common sense into a pamphlet! Fun to speculate though.
    I’m glad you had such a nice 4th. Ours became a surprise when a grandson from S.F. showed up for hamburgers and potato salad. The thrill came when Charlie paid no attention to the fireworks noise instead of going bonkers as he always has. I even heard one go off last night.

    So sorry about your friend. That must be confusing to have one wet and one dry. Mine is dry unfortunately getting worse after a couple of years of being OK. Probably a lot due to age. I just ordered a new RX and hopefully it will help. I also cranked up the print size on the computers. Hey, we do what we can.

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