IT HAD TO BE YOU


Big shopping day at Costco yesterday; three items divided between the two of us. Seems a waste of time to have such a short list, but it was a nice day to get out. Dr. A has joined a large group of people who have become highly aware of the ethnic clientele in Costco. I have begun to appreciate my failing vision, because though I hear the music of multiple languages, all I see are legs and feet. In this time of year we see shorts, colorful saris, and all sorts of pants on all sorts of bottoms. As for shoes, there are high heels, low heels, sandals, flip flops, trainers. School is still out for another week or two, and there are progeny of all sorts clammering for attention. A trip to Costco is an education.

While at the check stand I heard a voice softly singing the old song “It Had To Be You” with which I have been intimately attached to for 74 years, because it is “our” song, claimed shortly after Dr. A and I decided that we liked each other well enough to have a song. The words in this one seem to convey affection without becoming too mushy.

Do people today have songs they claim as “their” songs? I suppose they do, but it’s hard to get romantic listening to the music of today. It evokes such tender feelings to hear a song which has meaning to both parties. I was insulted years ago when attending a friend;s birthday party where they played “our” song for him. I confess that I have the problem of becoming proprietary about things like names, songs, etc.

I was sorry to hear about the death of Aretha Franklin today. Her inimitable music will be greatly missed. It was music with meaningful lyrics delivered by an amazing God-given voice. RIP Aretha.

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Author: kaytisweetlandrasmussen83

I am a retired fine arts teacher, sculptor/painter, writer, and a native Californian. I love my family,dogs, horses, movies, reading and music, probably in that order. I have been married forever to a very nice man who is nice to old ladies, dogs and children.

14 thoughts on “IT HAD TO BE YOU”

  1. We almost made it to Costco last week. It would have been our first time. A good American-born friend was going to introduce us to the delights of Costco. One needs to be a member of that organisation but the friend assured us we could shop on his membership.
    Alas, it had to be cancelled. We now look forward to going there next week. I don’t know what I still could buy. I am sure Helvi might be able to sort that problem out.
    Vale Aretha.

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    1. Oh I am sure you will find a lot to buy. My son in law always said he did not like Costco, because he couldn’t get out less than $200. But he went often. We spent all of $30 yesterday. I use a list of what we need and sometimes get seduced by something I never thought of. I think your Aldi is similar.

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  2. I’m saddened by the world’s loss of Aretha as well—I’ve listened to her for decades. B and I have discontinued our membership to Cosco, since we always end up with too much food in our cupboards after a trip there. Nothing in small amounts there!

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    1. Yes, the big box stores do make you get larger supplies than you need and you need space to store. I like their meat though and don’t have to shop so often for it. I think we find stores which carry what we use. There are several near us which we go to for certain things. Shopping is so different from when we had a family at home. I only went twice a month and had huge carts. Now we go several times a week for small amounts.

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    1. I was surprised by her history which they have been talking about. She had a very sad personal life in spite of all the glory of her public one. We just never know what people’s secret life can be. Perhaps that is what gave her such power and insight which she was able to transmit to her music. She will be missed.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. After I announced I would quit writing my blog, I took a break from all things blog related but finally realized I missed my blog friends and so returned to find you bringing life and interest to a visit to Costco and the things you saw heard, and thought about while there. And, as always, I enjoyed both the topic and the approach to it. I’ve never heard my children or grandchildren talk about a special song they share with their partner. I wonder if having an “our song” is no longer the thing to do or if they have one and have never mentioned it to me. I’m going to ask them.

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    1. Your comment reminded me that I don’t know about my progeny either. I also wondered about those who have had more than one special person. That could get confusing.
      I’m happy to see you back Janet. You have such great insight and I have always enjoyed your writing. I guess we all have something to contribute to the great blogging community.

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  4. My friends and I sometimes joke about our generation sitting around on the porch of The Home, listening to the Rolling Stones or The Doors and reminiscing about the unbearably quaint 1960s.

    But when it comes to an “our song,” the one that still makes me smile was the one my dad and I shared. He taught me to dance, and most of the instruction took place up at the Masonic Lodge, on family nights. There was a steak dinner (burgers for the kids) and then there was a night of dancing to a live band. This was the 1950s, and big band music was the thing. I learned to swing dance to “In The Mood,”, and when that song played, my mother had to sit one out while Daddy and I danced!

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    1. A sweet memory indeed. Nothing like a father and daughter. My mom and dad’s favorite song was “Side By Side” and she had my girls sing it at her inauguration as Worthy Matron . It seems silly in a way but when a certain music plays which has meaning to more than one it is quite tender. At least it reminds them of why they care for one another.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. What a perfect song for you and Dr. Advice. You two are an inspiration in how to maintain (gracefully) a long-term marriage. Why, I believe you gave me some excellent advice just two days ago…

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